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Perhaps the most significant abolitionist emblem of the late eighteenth to early nineteenth century was Josiah Wedgwood’s “kneeling supplicant” and its caption “Am I Not a Man and a Brother?” Appearing on ceramic medallions, coins, and numerous items of personal fashion, this iconic device appealed to the sympathy and Christianity of participants in the antislavery movement on both sides of the Atlantic. Less well known, however, is that Wedgwood adapted his design from stock figures of captive barbarians featured on ancient Roman coins. Hitherto unexplored is the likelihood that Wedgwood encountered this image on eighteenth-century paste impressions (impronte), which reproduced and disseminated a wide array of ancient and contemporary iconography. Ultimately, Wedgwood’s use of this type of kneeling figure, originally intended to project Rome’s power over its foreign enemies, reflected a basic awareness of its classical meanings, while imbuing it with modern colonialist attitudes about race and slavery. More
Dates Dates: Tuesday, November 10 | 4-5:30 p.m.
Pricing Pricing:
Location Location:
Status Status: 300 open seats left
Class Size Class size: 300 seats
 
“These are unprecedented times.” This has become a common phrase used to describe the COVID-19 crisis, but is our experience truly unprecedented? In this course, we will examine three of the most devastating epidemics in American history: Yellow Fever in the 1790s, Spanish Flu in 1918, and HIV/AIDS in the 1980s. Using historical accounts as well as various imaginative representations, we will consider the social, medical, and governmental responses to these outbreaks and the subsequent effects on “American” identity.

Readings: M.K. Czerwiec, Taking Turns: Stories from HIV/AIDS Care Unit 371
More
Dates Dates: Tuesdays, December 1 - 22 | 1-2:30 ET
Pricing Pricing:
Location Location:
Status Status: 27 open seats left
Class Size Class size: 30 seats
 
Speakers:

Dr. Wyatt Newman, Professor, Department of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, CWRU
School of Engineering 

Sharona Hoffman, Edgar A. Hahn Professor of Law, Professor of Bioethics, and Co-Director of the law-Medicine Center, CWRU School of Law 

Moderator: Spencer Neth, Professor Emeritus, CWRU School of Law


Artificial intelligence is defined in computer science as intelligence demonstrated by
machines, unlike natural intelligence displayed by humans and animals.


Our speakers will cover some of the areas where artificial intelligence is being used or foreseen and
present the benefits as well as some of the detriments and ethical issues that arise.

Sponsored by The Association for Continuing Education.
More
Dates Dates: Monday, October 12 | 1-3 p.m. ET
Pricing Pricing:
Location Location:
Status Status: 166 open seats left
Class Size Class size: 200 seats
 
The Association for Continuing Education is a volunteer organization dedicated to providing and supporting continuing education programs in cooperation with the Laura and Alvin Siegal Lifelong Learning Program at Case Western Reserve University.



Membership is open to those who love to learn. ACE independently provides the Grazella Shepherd Lecture Day, Discussion Day, Acclaimed Authors Luncheon and the Annual Book Sale, trips, a semi-annual newsletter and a summer luncheon series featuring local authors.
More
Dates Dates: September 1, 2020 - August 31, 2021
Pricing Pricing:
Location Location:
Status Status: 500 open seats left
Class Size Class size: 700 seats
 
In this lecture, we will explore the relationship between one of history's most famous kings and his brother. Many historians treat Arrhidaeus as an afterthought because he lived with an intellectual disability, but he nevertheless ruled Macedon for six years after his brother's sudden death. Professor Leon will discuss how Arrhidaeus charted a course through a chaotic political situation and helped transform European politics for centuries to come. More
Dates Dates: Thursday, November 4 | 4 - 5:30 p.m. ET
Pricing Pricing:
Location Location:
Status Status: 300 open seats left
Class Size Class size: 300 seats
 
Origins Science Scholars

Fall 2020

During this unique program, community members engage with one another and with leading scholars to investigate rapidly developing areas of origins science.

Archaeologist Dr Mark Aldenderfer, the MacArthur Professor of Anthropology at the University of California, Merced, has spent his life investigating the origins of settled village life, human adaptation to high altitude environments, hunting and gathering, and early plant and animal domestication. Dr, Aldenderfer’s work encompasses the sites of Asana, Qillqatani, and Jisk'a Iru Muqu, and survey projects in the Osmore valley of Peru, and in river valleys in the Lake Titicaca Basin, as well as projects in Ethiopia, the US, and Tibet, where his research on Buddhist and pre-Buddhist occupations in the Himalayas have elucidated the fascinating cultures of this region.

Friends of the Institute for the Science of Origins & Emeritus Faculty are eligible for the member rate for this program.

More
Dates Dates: Tuesday, October 27 | 6 p.m. EDT
Pricing Pricing:
Location Location:
Status Status: 242 open seats left
Class Size Class size: 300 seats
 
As the first woman Police Chief of a major American City, Shelley Zimmerman witnessed San Diego's overall crime falling to its lowest level in 49 years during her tenure. She will discuss the authentic leadership principles she instituted and why public safety must be a shared responsibility. More
Dates Dates: Friday, November 20 12 p.m. EST
Pricing Pricing:
Location Location:
Status Status: 186 open seats left
Class Size Class size: 200 seats
 
The death of George Floyd spawned a summer of protests, where activists chanted that Black Lives Matter. Meanwhile, Floyd's funeral allowed his family to remember him and to celebrate his humanity. Burials, funerals, and commemorations have long served as an important opportunity for the Black community to reassert the value of Black lives, strengthen community bonds, and make political statements. This talk will examine this history from the late 18th century to the present discussing slave cemeteries, African-American funeral homes, and the significance of the public funerals of Emmett Till, Martin Luther King, and victims of police violence like George Floyd. More
Dates Dates: Monday, February 8 | 1-2:30 p.m. ET
Pricing Pricing:
Location Location:
Status Status: 300 open seats left
Class Size Class size: 300 seats
 
The book of Isaiah is not a story; it is a polemic. Born at a time when Israel was divided into two, Isaiah son of Amotz watched the final destruction of the Northern Kingdom. Join us for a look at the context and content of this influential but tragic book. More
Dates Dates: Wednesdays, October 21, 28; November 4, 11 | 10 a.m. - noon EDT
Pricing Pricing:
Location Location:
Status Status: 21 open seats left
Class Size Class size: 30 seats
 
The book of Isaiah is not a story; it is a polemic. Born at a time when Israel was divided into two, Isaiah son of Amotz watched the final destruction of the Northern Kingdom. Join us for a look at the context and content of this influential but tragic book. More
Dates Dates: Wednesdays, October 21, 28; November 4, 11 | 6:30-8:30 p.m. EDT
Pricing Pricing:
Location Location:
Status Status: 25 open seats left
Class Size Class size: 30 seats
 

Journey through all twenty-four books of the Jewish Bible,

studying them one-by-one, with master teachers as your guides. This unique

approach explores the major themes, broad context, and key events of each book

- all in an open, thoughtful, participatory atmosphere.





10/12 Introduction, 7 p.m.





Five Books of the Torah, October 19 - November 16  (10 a.m. - noon)

10/19 Genesis: The cosmos are created, and first families

are formed. Leonie Jacob, Graduate of Program of Advanced Talmud Study, Yeshiva

University




Books of Wisdom and Wanderings, April 19 - June 7 (10 a.m. - noon)





4/19 Psalms: among the Bible's most well-known verses, these

150 poems put words to feelings of thanksgiving, joy, and lament. Eddie Sukol,

Rabbi, The Shul





4/26 Proverbs: wit and wisdom in the form of one-line advice

to the young and old. Leonie Jacob, Graduate of Program of Advanced Talmud Study,

Yeshiva University





5/3 Job: a tormented character asks thorny questions about

good, evil, and human suffering. Ezra Blaustein, Doctoral Candidate, University

of Chicago Divinity School





5/10 Daniel: a dramatic narrative woven into fantastical

visions, together map out the ultimate guide for life in exile. Jo Bruce,

Program Manager, Whole in One at CWRU-Siegal





5/24 Ezra and Nehemiah: present the triumphs and challenges

of returning home from exile. Susan Stone, Director of Spiritual Care,

Hillcrest Hospital





6/7 Chronicles: Offers a telescope-view of history all over

again, raising the obvious question, Why? Jonathan Berger, Associate Head of

School, Gross Schechter Day School.





 





Book: The Jewish Bible JPS Tanakh or Jerusalem Bible, Koren


More
Dates Dates: Mondays, April 19 - June 7 10 a.m. - noon EDT (No Class May 17, 31)
Pricing Pricing:
Location Location:
Status Status: 10 open seats left
Class Size Class size: 20 seats
 

Journey through all twenty-four books of the Jewish Bible,

studying them one-by-one, with master teachers as your guides. This unique

approach explores the major themes, broad context, and key events of each book

- all in an open, thoughtful, participatory atmosphere.





9/21 Introduction, 7 p.m.





Five Books of the Torah, October 19 - November 16  (10 a.m. - noon)

10/19 Genesis: The cosmos are created, and first families

are formed. Leonie Jacob, Graduate of Program of Advanced Talmud Study, Yeshiva

University




Books of Wisdom and Wanderings, April 19 - June 7 (10 a.m. - noon)





4/19 Psalms: among the Bible's most well-known verses, these

150 poems put words to feelings of thanksgiving, joy, and lament. Eddie Sukol,

Rabbi, The Shul





4/26 Proverbs: wit and wisdom in the form of one-line advice

to the young and old. Leonie Jacob, Graduate of Program of Advanced Talmud Study,

Yeshiva University





5/3 Job: a tormented character asks thorny questions about

good, evil, and human suffering. Ezra Blaustein, Doctoral Candidate, University

of Chicago Divinity School





5/10 Daniel: a dramatic narrative woven into fantastical

visions, together map out the ultimate guide for life in exile. Jo Bruce,

Program Manager, Whole in One at CWRU-Siegal





5/24 Ezra and Nehemiah: present the triumphs and challenges

of returning home from exile. Susan Stone, Director of Spiritual Care,

Hillcrest Hospital





6/7 Chronicles: Offers a telescope-view of history all over

again, raising the obvious question, Why? Jonathan Berger, Associate Head of

School, Gross Schechter Day School.





 





Book: The Jewish Bible JPS Tanakh or Jerusalem Bible, Koren


More
Dates Dates: Mondays, April 19 - June 7 7 - 9 ET (No Class May 17, 31)
Pricing Pricing:
Location Location:
Status Status: 19 open seats left
Class Size Class size: 20 seats
 
Few musical titans have been more ubiquitous than the German-born composer of powerful and poetic masterpieces - Ludwig van Beethoven. So does he need to be saluted, even on what may appear an important milestone? Two days after the 250th anniversary of Beethoven's birth, we'll explore why the answer is an emphatic "Yes!" More
Dates Dates: Friday, December 18 12 p.m. EST
Pricing Pricing:
Location Location:
Status Status: 159 open seats left
Class Size Class size: 200 seats
 
The establishment of a Jewish State presented growing challenges to the collectivist, statist, patriotic
Zionist narrative that dominated Israel's early years. Kassow and Roskies will examine Jewish writing
during the Holocaust, the Renaissance of Jewish life in America after WWII and Jewish creativity behind
the iron curtain in the Soviet Union before 1973 as they tie into the foundations and formation of the
Jewish State of Israel.

This lecture is offered as a part of the Posen Library Lecture Series.
More
Dates Dates: Tuesday, November 17 4 p.m. EST
Pricing Pricing:
Location Location:
Status Status: 138 open seats left
Class Size Class size: 200 seats
 

Heading into the 2020 election year, the United States is experiencing what sometimes feels like unprecedented political strife and polarization. This is not, however, the first time that this country has experienced extreme crisis, conflict, and polarization. This course will center on the presentation and discussion of other points of contentious conflict in our history and how they were resolved, including: the battle to approve the Constitution, the battle over slavery, Reconstruction, Jim Crow, and the rise of the Klu Klux Klan, the economic disparities of the Gilded Age, the crusade for women's suffrage, the Great Depression and FDR's New Deal, McCarthyism, the Civil Rights Movement of the 1960s, and the struggle for civil rights legislation under Clinton and Obama.

Required text: The Soul of America: The Battle for Our Better Angels, Jon Meacham

This course is offered with the generous support of the Association for Continuing Education (ACE).

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Dates Dates: Fridays, October 2-November 20 | 10-11:30 a.m. EDT
Pricing Pricing:
Location Location:
Class Size Class size: 28 seats
Class full
 
The end of the 20th century hosted quite a few critical historical events which will be examined during
this lecture. These events include the rise of feminism, the emergence of Holocaust consciousness and
its permutations, Jewish Nobel prize winners for literature, the fall of the Berlin Wall, the election of
Menachem Begin, and the creation of the Oslo Accords.

This lecture is offered as a part of the Posen Library Lecture Series. 
More
Dates Dates: Wednesday, October 21 4 p.m. EDT
Pricing Pricing:
Location Location:
Status Status: 120 open seats left
Class Size Class size: 200 seats
 
Dante's Divine Comedy is a world literature masterpiece that has come to be regarded as one of our greatest human treasures. It offers an almost encyclopedic presentation of classical and medieval ethics, philosophy, theology, politics, and some of the most imaginative, stirring and beautiful poetry ever written. It is an eschatological adventure as Dante takes us through the three transmundane kingdoms of Inferno, Purgatorio, and Paradiso. During this imaginary journey, the poet explores the weaknesses and strengths, the ugliness and beauty of human souls, of humankind. Readings: Dante, Divine Comedy (Allen Mandelbaum or Princeton Dante Project’s translations suggested, but not required) More
Dates Dates: Tuesdays, October 13 - November 17 4 - 5:30 p.m. EDT
Pricing Pricing:
Location Location:
Status Status: 9 open seats left
Class Size Class size: 30 seats
 
Course Overview: • Learn where Additive Manufacturing (AM) technologies can be applied for design or economic advantage • Understand lightweighting AM technologies, trends and applications in transportation industries • Demonstrate problem-solving skills in lightweighting through analysis of case studies • Learn the fundamentals of materials science and how to improve properties such as strength, stiffness and ductility in a wide array of lightweight material options • Understand the use of advanced materials databases (e.g., Granta) and the impact of key market drivers on the selection criteria for critical applications in the transportation industry. More
Dates Dates: Tuesday, November 10, 2020 | 8:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Pricing Pricing:
Location Location:
Status Status: 50 open seats left
Class Size Class size: 50 seats
 
The intersection of Jewish and popular music culture has been an exceedingly rich and productive encounter. Is it Jewish? Is it American? Can we claim the voices of such luminaries as Bob Dylan, Leonard Cohen, Carole King, and a host of others? More
Dates Dates: Wednesdays, October 21 - November 11 | 1 - 2:30 p.m. EDT
Pricing Pricing:
Location Location:
Status Status: 9 open seats left
Class Size Class size: 30 seats
 
This course will examine the state of the American economy in the context of the 2020
Presidential campaign and the coronavirus crisis. It will include a discussion of the major
economic thinkers and basic economic concepts and apply them to the challenges facing the
U.S. economy today. These will include issues relating to the consolidation of much of the
economy into massive corporate giants, the problems of inflation, deflation and the business
cycle, growing income and wealth disparities and the nation’s health care system.
The course will explore the present and future impact of the coronavirus crisis and the role of
monetary policy, the Federal Reserve and fiscal policy. It will also discuss alternatives to
American capitalism, issues of international trade and the U.S. China dispute and the conflicting
views of the Presidential candidates as to how best to address America’s financial future.

Required text: The Worldly Philosophers, Robert Heilbroner



This course is offered with the generous support of the Association for Continuing Education (ACE).

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Dates Dates: Tuesdays, September 29-November 17 | 10-11:30 a.m. EDT
Pricing Pricing:
Location Location:
Status Status: 11 open seats left
Class Size Class size: 25 seats
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